Category Archive: Saving Money

Stores That Offer Free Or Discounted Prescription Drugs

Check out this updated list of stores and pharmacies that offer free or discounted prescription drugs.  Save money on your prescriptions.  List updated once a month.  Last updated December 17, 2014.

Click the links to view information about each store’s discount prescription drug program –

Free Medications -

Publix – free antibiotics plus Amlodipine, Lisinopril, and Metformin

Meijer – free antibiotics plus prenatal vitamins, Metformin,  and Atorvastatin Calcium

Free Antibiotics -

Giant Eagle – free antibiotics

Harris Teeter – free antibiotics

discount presriptions

Discounted Medications –

Kroger – $4 / $10 generics

Ralph’s – $4 / $10 generics

Target – $4 / $10 generics

Walmart – $4 / $10 generics (some states)

Fred’s – $4 generics

This list was updated December 16, 2014 and will be updated once per month.

Information is subject to change.

 

 

 

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24 Hours Of Saving Money

24 Hours of Saving Money:  This is an around-the-clock look at some of the financial decisions we make – and how those decisions affect our pocketbook, our family, and our future.  My wife and I have three kids, we live busy lives, and we are work hard.  Here’s a typical day for our family – broken down by how we save money – and when.

5:00 AM – Enjoy a brisk walk or an at-home workout.

Savings = $300 in annual gym-membership fees – and lower long-term health care costs

6:00 AM – Skip the coffee shop and brew at home.

Savings = $3-5 a day – and $800-1500 a year

7:00 AM – Check the thermostat.

Savings = Heating and cooling costs represent a tremendous expense.  For my house, I’ve calculated that wise thermostat-management saves %15 off of my electric bill.

8:00 AM – Drive carefully and below the speed limit.

Savings = Avoid speeding tickets, accidents (which increase insurance costs), protect yourself (and others) and save gasoline.

9:00 AM – Turn off phone data and take advantage of wi-fi.

I recently underwent the dreaded transition from an unlimited to a limited plan.  I quickly learned to take advantage of wi-fi, both at home and at work.

10:00 AM – Pass on the sugary, mid-morning snack and opt for some protein.

I’m convinced, on days when I consume a mid-morning, sugary snack – I stay hungry.  When I choose protein, I’m less apt to snack, which saves money and holes on the belt.

10:15 AM – Open the blinds and turn off any unnecessary lights.

This saves energy and the natural light is good for the soul.

12:00 Noon – Order water with lunch.

If you can brown-bag it, that’s awesome.  For me, when I eat out for lunch, I try to be reasonable, and I’ll skip appetizers and soda.  Savings = $1.50 to $3.50 per meal

1:00 PM – Make a transfer to a savings account.

Even if it is a small amount, it’s a good idea to get in the habit of initiating transfers to a savings account.  I do this two or three times a week.  A sgrowing savings account balance keeps me motivated.

2:00 PM – Go with the sweater.

If you work at home and have control of the thermostat, a sweater is a great way to stay warm – and save a little money.

3:00 PM – Know what’s for supper.

I know it’s only 3 in the afternoon – but if you wait until much later to think about supper – you’ll probably opt for convenience foods or take-out.  I’ll usually text my wife around this time and we’ll make sure we’re both on the same page.

3:30 PM – Be ready with a plan for the kids and their activities.

We have three kids – ranging from 6 to 15 – and they each have after-school activities.  It’s important – very important – that my wife and I know which kid is going where, with whom, how much money they’ll need, when they need to be picked up, and when we’ll all be back at home.  This can become an expensive time for families!  Snacks, drinks, t-shirts, fees – these add up.  Be ready with a plan and a budget for these activities.

5:00 PM – Check online for gas prices and fuel up.

There are several websites – my favorite is Gas Buddy – for checking the lowest cost for fuel.  I’ll take my automobile or my wife’s and fill up at the cheapest station.

6:00 PM – Cook and clean up – together.

I’m the primary cook in our family, but at meal time, we all pitch in.  I’ll cook the main course, the kids will help with setting the table, and my wife will handle most of the clean up.  We skip the high-cost of restaurants – and since the kids have a hand in the cooking, they’re more apt to eat and not waste food.

6:30 PM – Talk with the kids about the upcoming week.

With our oldest, we’ll ask about any club-related or sports-related dues.  With our youngest, we’ll find out if the book-mo-bile is coming to school.  It’s important that we know about any upcoming expenses – so that we can have these in our budget.

7:00 PM – Read the Bible.

For us, reading the Bible, as a family, is incredibly important.  It reminds us of the kindness of our Savior – and the importance of giving to others.  How does this save money?  Many of the principals that guide our financial lives our found in the pages of scripture.

8:00 PM – Check out personal finance blogs.

I cannot begin to calculate the amount of money I have saved, simply by reading and following the information I’ve found from my fellow personal finance bloggers.  Check out the list at the bottom of this page for some of my favorites – and pfblogs.org for an aggregator of great personal finance information.

8:30 PM – Hang up those clothes.

We have an electric clothes dryer – but we have taken to hanging up almost all of our clothes.  They seem to last longer, and air-drying saves money.  So, just before bed, I’ll hang up a load of clothing.  In the morning, my wife will hang place them in our closets.

9:30 PM – Skip the television and read a book.

I’ll keep the television turned off – and instead choose a good book.  This saves money – and hopefully – expands the mind.

10: PM – Bundle up.

In the winter, save money by turning down the heat a bit and using a good blanket.  We live in the South – and the temptation here is turn on the heat when the temperature dips below 70!

1:00 AM – Change that diaper and enjoy the kiddo.

When our kids were little, this was the time when they generally woke up, in need of a diaper change. While you’re up, you may as well check out the savings from  Amazon Mom. You’ll receive up to 20% off the cost of diapers – and you’ll enjoy the additional benefits of Amazon Prime.  Click the link for a free 30-day trial!  Also, if you have little ones – cherish these late nights.  I know you are exhausted, but these times will soon be gone.  Ours are all big-kids, and while we are thankful for where they are now, we miss those nights of rocking.

2:00 AM – Wash those clothes and those dishes.

Did you know that certain power companies charge less for power, depending on the time of day?  Our washing machine has a timer, so we’ll set it for early in the morning, thus avoiding the more energy-expensive time of day.  We’ll also run our dish washer at night – and put the dishes away in the morning.

All day long, we have opportunities to save money.  Here and there, we save a few dollars, until, at the end of the day, we’ve saved several.  Obviously, each day presents its own challenges – and opportunities.  Take the time to analyze your daily routine – and look for opportunities to save.  Blessings.

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How To Save Money On Repairs

Here are a few tips and tricks for saving money on repairs –

Keep track of your manuals.  I have a binder wherein I keep the manuals for all of the tools and appliances that we buy.  Quick tip – If you’ve lost your manual, check online.  Search by manufacturer and model number.

Check to see if the item is under warranty.  Remember those little warranty cards that come with the stuff you buy?  They’re important!  Keep up with them – and register stuff.  If something breaks, and it is still under warranty, you may have it repaired, or replaced, for free!

See if you paid for the item with a credit card.  I know, I know.  I’m no fan of credit cards, but, that doesn’t take away from the fact that several credit card companies offer extended warranties on items purchased with their cards.

Take a look on youtube.  If you have a bit of a “DIY” spirit – search for the repair that you need to make on youtube.  I’ve learned how to replace the drive belt on my dryer and to repair our garbage disposal, simply by watching videos on youtube.  What an awesome resource.

Talk to friends and neighbors.  I was talking to my neighbor the other day, telling him about building a small desk for my son.  A few days later, he stopped by – and asked if I could help him with a small project, repairing a broken board on his front porch.  He saved a few bucks – and I got to repair the board and look like a hero in front of my boy!

tool wall repairs

Visit your local library.  This is old school – but very, very practical.  I love old woodworking books, and our local library has several of them.  I’ve learned how to frame up a shop, install an electrical outlet, and lay shingles, all from books available at most libraries.

Check out the bulletin board at a home center, lumber yard, or feed store.  I live in a rural part of the state – and there are dozens of carpenters who tack their business cards to bulletin boards in local stores.  Grab a few of these and make a few calls.  You might be surprised by the reasonable rates some will offer – especially if the job you need doing is a one-person gig.

Discuss the cost for parts and supplies before hiring a contractor or carpenter.  Often, these folks will be able to buy parts and supplies (think lumber, paint), cheaper than you can.  However, in some cases, if you are willing to do a little legwork, you might find better deals.  Discuss this with your carpenter and figure out what works best for you.

Buy new?  This can be a tough one – but there are times when purchasing a new item is actually cheaper than fixing an old one.  So, do a bit of research and make sure that a repair is worth the money.  Blessings.

Find out if the item has been recalled.  I almost forgot this one.  It’s a good idea, any time you have a product that isn’t performing like you think it should be, to check for a recall.  A simple internet search will reveal several sites where you can find recall information.

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State Park Parking Fees For Parks In All 50 States

Below is a summary of state park parking fees for parks in all 50 states.  This is an update to a summary from 4 years ago.  We love our state parks here in Georgia – and we enjoy visiting state parks when we travel.  I thought this list might be helpful for others.  Information is subject to change, so please check with the individual park you plan to visit, prior to your trip.  For some states, the state park parking fees are referred to as daily-use fees or entrance fees.

Alabama State Parks – From the Alabama State Parks website – Alabama State Parks offer ideal places to stay: resorts, hotels, cabins and cottages, camping; and fun places to play: hiking, biking, golf, fishing, paddling, swimming, birding and wildlife viewing or just relaxing. Clicking the above link will take you to a list of Alabama’s 22 state parks. I couldn’t find any information about “free days” at any of the Alabama parks, but most have very, very modest daily-use fees, including some parks which charge just $1-$3 for adults and 25 cents – $2  for kids and seniors.

Alaska State Parks – Alaska has 119 state parks. While not offering any “free days” most of the parks charge a flat $5 daily-use fee per automobile. A family of 6 could visit a park, spend the day, and do so for just $5.  Click the link and you can view daily parking fees – as well as fees for camping and boating.

Arizona State Parks – Arizona has 31 state parks, with many parks offering daily-use fees between $5 and $20 per car (up to 4 adults) and between $2 and $5 per individual / bicycle.  Also, several parks offer discounts for Veterans and Active Military.

Arkansas State Parks – According to the Arkansas State Park FAQs – There is no fee for entry to an Arkansas state park, although tour fees are charged for access to some facilities. A wide variety of activities can be enjoyed at no cost in the parks including hiking, mountain biking, picnicking, launching a boat, and participating in most of the interpretive programs. You can enjoy the museums and their collections (exception is Historic Washington State Park) at no charge. However, a variety of fees are charged in the parks for the rental of facilities such as campsites, cabins, lodge guest rooms; dining; participating in certain activities such as guided horseback rides; specific interpretive programs led by park interpreters; and special events.

California State Parks – From the California State Parks website – At most parks, Day Use Fees are charged for parking only. There is no charge to walk or bike into these parks. Most historical parks and museums charge a Day Use Fee per person. The parking fees range from $4 – $20. California has 278 state parks. It’s awesome to see that several are free for daily-use by walkers / bicyclists.

Colorado State Parks – Colorado has 42 state parks, with most charging $7-$9 per vehicle fee for daily-use.

Connecticut State Parks – From the Connecticut State Parks website – Some facilities do not charge a parking fee and others charge only for weekends and holidays. Connecticut has 76 state parks, and more than 25% of them are available free for daily-use on weekdays. That’s pretty awesome. Most of the parks charge a per vehicle fee of $9 or $15 for weekend use.

Delaware State Parks – Inland Delaware State Parks charge daily-use fee of $3 for Delaware Registered Vehicles and $6 per day for Out-Of-State Registered Vehicles. Ocean Delaware State Parks charge daily use-fee of $4 for Delaware Registered Vehicles and $8 per day for Out-Of-State Registered Vehicles. I couldn’t find any information about “free days” – but $3 for a vehicle-full of parents and kids seems like a super-deal to me.

Florida State Parks – Fees for vehicles range from $4 to $10 and the fees for individuals range from $2 to $5.

Georgia State Parks – Georgia has 64 state parks. The parks charge a flat $5 per vehicle daily-use free. If you have a valid library card in the state of Georgia you can “check out” a park pass, and visit any Georgia State Park – for free!

state-park-parking-fees

Hawaii State Parks – Hawaii has 53 state parks – and not one of them (that I could find) charges a daily-use fee! That, my friends, is very, very awesome. Hawaii State Parks are some of the most beautiful parks in the world – and they’re free to visit.

Idaho State Parks - Those who travel in vehicles will be charged a $5 parking fee per vehicle fee.

Illinois State Parks – From the Illinois State Parks website – The Illinois Department of Natural Resources does not charge an Entrance Fee to any state owned or operated land with the exception of Wildlife Prairie Park and sites with beaches. Beaches charge a $1 a day per person for beach use only. It took a little searching on the website, but there it is. Illinois has 60 state parks, and besides one and those with beaches, they’re all free for daily-use.

Indiana State Parks – Indiana has 26 state parks, and most charge a daily-use fee of $5 per automobile (for in-state visitors) and $7 per automobile (for out-of-state visitors).

Iowa State Parks – Iowa has 68 state parks – and all of them are free for daily-use. Awesome!

Kansas State Parks – Kansas charges $5 per vehicle, for parking. Seniors can receive discounted fees. Kansas has 24 state parks.

Kentucky State Parks – From the Kentucky State Parks website – We charge no general admission fee. Awesome! Save your money and visit one of Kentucky’s 52 state parks – for free!

Louisiana State Parks – Louisiana has 20 state parks, and most charge just $2 per person for entrance.

Maine State Parks – Maine charges between $2 to $4.50 per adult (12 and over) and $1 for children ages 5 – 11 for daily-use of most state parks. These are in-state resident fees. Out-of-state residents are charged a slightly rate at each park.  Maine has 39 state parks.

Maryland State Parks – Maryland has 45 state parks.  The rates vary from park to park.  (I’d love to be more precise, but the fees vary, based on time-of-year and park-to-park.)

Massachusetts State Parks – Most Massachusetts parks charge a parking fee.  Click the link to view fees, by park.  Again, I would love to be more specific, but the information isn’t located one one specific page.  Good news – If you have a Massachusetts library card, you can borrow a parking pass – and visit a state park for free!

Michigan State Parks – Michigan has 98 state parks – and has a unique pay setup.  Basically, residents pay $11 for a yearly parking-pass for all state parks – and non-residents can buy the same pass for $31 – or pay $9 per vehicle for a single, day-pass.  Passes can be purchased online, at the various parks, or when purchasing a Michigan license plate.

Minnesota State Parks – Minnesota has 74 state parks and they each charge $5 per vehicle for daily-use. I did not find any information about walk-ups – but the Minnesota website is super-easy to use, and very user-friendly!

Mississippi State Parks – Mississippi has 24 state parks and they each charge $3 per vehicle (with up to 6 passengers) for daily-use.

Missouri State Parks – From the Missouri State Parks website – The Missouri state park system does not charge entrance fees. However, there are fees associated with camping, lodging, tours, museums and certain special events. That’s 83 state parks to visit – with no charge for daily-use!

Montana State Parks – Residents of Montana can pay $5 when they purchase a Montana license plate and their entrance into any of Montana’s 54 state parks is absolutely free. Those choosing not to pay the $4 (when purchasing their license plates) – and out-of-state residents – pay $5 per vehicle at most state parks.

Nebraska State Parks – Nebraska charges a flat $5 per person fee for daily-use of its state parks. Nebraska has 18 state parks.

Nevada State Parks – From the Nevada State Parks website – Permits are purchased upon entry to individual parks at a standard entrance fee of $7 to $12 per day with a $2.00 discount to Nevada residents. These permits vary by park and cover the basic entrance to a park. Nevada has 23 state parks.

New Hampshire State Parks – New Hampshire has 75 state parks. Daily-use fee for adults is $4 and $2 for kids 6-11. Kids under 6 and Senior Adults are free.

New Jersey State Parks – New Jersey has 50 state parks. Each park has its own fee schedule, depending on the time of year and / or the day of the week. Some parks are free for certain times of the year, while most charge between $5 and $20 per vehicle.

New Mexico State Parks – New Mexico charges $5 per vehicle for daily-use and is free for walk-ins / bicyclists. New Mexico has 35 state parks – some of the most beautiful in the country.

New York State Parks – New York has 178 state parks. Most charge between $6 and $10 per vehicle for daily-use.

North Carolina State Parks – From the North Carolina State Parks website – Only three parks (Falls Lake, Jordan Lake and Kerr Lake) have entrance gate fees. Entrance fees at those parks are charged to supplement operational costs and help maintain and improve the areas for visitors. That means that 37 of North Carolina’s 40 parks are free for daily-use.

North Dakota State Parks – North Dakota has 15 state parks and each park charges a $5 parking fee per vehicle. They also offer a library loan program for in-state residents in certain cities. Awesome.

Ohio State Parks74 state parks – all free for daily-use, with no charge for parking!  So cool.

Oklahoma State Parks – From the Oklahoma State Parks FAQs –  Oklahoma State Parks do not charge an entrance fee but there are four parks in the system that have day use fee areas.  Natural Falls State Park near West Siloam Springs and the Cisco Road Area at Lake Murray State Park near Ardmore each charge a day use fee of $4.00. The Fisherman’s Point Area at Tenkiller State Park in Vian and the Little Axe Area at Lake Thunderbird State Park in Norman each charge a day use fee of $5.00. This fee is charged per vehicle (carrying up to six passengers).

Oregon State Parks – Oregon has 192 state parks and most are free for daily-use. Those few that do charge a $5 fee per vehicle basis.

Pennsylvania State Parks – Pennsylvania has 120 state parks and they do not charge a daily-use or parking fee!

Rhode Island State Parks – Rhode Island has 22 state parks.  There are fees listed on the website for various parks, but I couldn’t find anything specific about parking or daily-use.

South Carolina State Parks – South Carolina has several state parks – and the parking fees appear to vary greatly, park-to-park.  You will have to click the link and find the park you are interested in visiting.

South Dakota State Parks – South Dakota charges a daily-use fee of $4 per person / $6 per vehicle.

Tennessee State Parks – From the Tennessee State Parks website – There is no access fee charged for any state park. There you have it. All 53 of Tennessee’s state parks are free for daily-use!

Texas State Parks – Texas has 133 state parks, some of which are free for daily-use. Others charge a fee.

Utah State Parks – Utah has 43 state parks. They charge between $7 and $10 for daily use – with discounts for Seniors.

Vermont State Parks – Vermont has 55 state parks. Fees are $3 for and $2 for kids ages 13 – 4. Kids 3 and under are free.

Virginia State Parks – Virginia charges $3 to $5 per vehicle for daily-use of its state parks, depending on the day of the week. Virginia has 35 state parks.

state-park-parking-fee

Washington State Parks – Washington has 141 state parks.  There is a $10 fee for daily use of each park.

West Virginia State Parks – From the West Virginia State Park website – There is no admission fee to enter areas operated by the state. Visit every chance you get. Thank you for your patronage.  Great job, West Virginia!

Wisconsin State Parks – Wisconsin has 66 state parks. The daily-use fees are $7 per in-state vehicle, $3 for in-state seniors, and $10 for out-of-state visitors.

Wyoming State Parks – Wyoming charges residents $4 and non-residents $6 for daily-use of its regular parks, $2 less for historic parks.

There were several states that offered discounts for seniors, members of the military, and children.  Check with the state you live in or are visiting to see if you qualify.  Also, some states had conflicting, or poorly organized, information.  Hit me up via @NCN with any corrections or additions.

Almost every state offers an annual pass to its state parks. Depending on the number of times you visit your state parks and the fees they charge, the annual pass might just be a great deal.  Also, many states have special rates for motorcycles, buses, and large groups.

The information in this post is a summary of my findings. All information is subject to change at any time and for any reason. I am not affiliated with any of the institutions linked in this post. Before planning a trip to any state park, do your own research and find out the exact nature of any fees you may incur.

This list took a long time to put together. If you find this list to be interesting, please consider sharing it with others via the links below.  Be blessed.

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